3 misconceptions

8 things to try

3 superpowers

3 common misconceptions about arguments...

1st misconception:

 

We think arguments are bad.

They're not bad, but they can be unproductive.

Reality:

2nd misconception:

 

We think arguments change minds.

We can only change our own minds and behavior.

Reality:

3rd misconception:

 

We think arguments end.

They have deep roots and will usually come back again.

Reality:

To unlock the superpower of disagreement, try these 8 things...

1st thing to try:

 

Watch how anxiety sparks.

2nd thing to try:

 

Talk to your internal voices.

3rd thing to try:

 

Develop honest bias.

4th thing to try:

 

Speak for yourself.

5th thing to try:

 

Ask questions that invite surprising answers.

6th thing to try:

 

Build arguments together.

7th thing to try:

 

Cultivate neutral spaces.

8th thing to try:

 

Accept reality, then participate in it.

These 8 things can make you at least 5% better at having productive disagreements.

You'll know it's working when:

1. Disagreements lead to growth, connection, and enjoyment.

You'll know it's working when:

2. You end up having fewer repetitive, frustrating arguments.

You'll know it's working when:

3. The world feels bigger.

Get your copy and learn the art of productive disagreement!

 

Amazon.com

Barnes & Noble

Indiebound

 

If you buy a copy and forward your purchase receipt to whyareweyelling@gmail.com you'll receive some extra bonuses!

 

 

Thank you!

“This is a life-changing book. Read it three times and then give a copy to anyone you care about. It will make things better.”
—Seth Godin, author of This is Marketing

 

“This is the perfect book at the perfect time to bring some sanity back into disagreements. Buster Benson unveils a new framework for arguing that helps you understand your biases and show other people theirs in a nonconfrontational way.”
—Annie Duke, author of Thinking in Bets

 

“Buster Benson’s methods are instantly actionable, his writing is funny and relatable, and his book is the ideal companion to Diffcult Conversations.”
—Adam Grant, author of Originals and Give and Take, and host of the TED podcast WorkLife