research advice for

anth 001D: counterculture


09-15-14

sarah elichko

social sciences librarian


What we'll talk about today:


1. Navigating citations, 

navigating the library


2. Finding sources that interest you


3. Evaluating potential sources



part one

Navigating citations,

navigating the library

---exercise one---


1. Split into pairs (and one group of three)


2. Take a slip with a citation on it.


3. Brief discussion.


4. Look up the source in Tripod. Write down the call number.


5. Go find your book in the library, and then bring it back to the Video Classroom.

navigating citations


1. Is this a citation for a book, journal article, or book chapter?

Journal article   44(3): 348-380

Book chapter   "In"  "ed." or "eds."


2. (For books and chapters) Is this book available in McCabe?

If it's only available from B or H, request it.


3. What's the call number? Which floor do I need to go to?

A-G = Lower Level   H-K = Second Level   L-Z = Third Level


---exercise one---


1. Split into pairs (and one group of three)

2. Take a slip with a citation on it.

3. Brief discussion.


4. Look up the source in Tripod. Write down the call number.


5. Go find your book in the library, and then bring it back to the Video Classroom.


part two


Finding sources
that interest you


Three key tips for finding the scholarly articles and books that you need:


  • Search in the right database. (e.g. JSTOR, Tripod)

  • Brainstorm search terms and try various combinations.

  • Learn how to use advanced search tools to most effectively combine your terms.

So where do you search for scholarly sources in anthropology?


The library catalog and multidisciplinary databases, which include books and articles by anthropologists

Tripod, JSTOR, Proquest


Anthropology-focused scholarly article databases

AnthroSource and Anthropology Plus




And how do you find those databases?



Start from the Research Guide for Anthropology 001D: Counterculture, linked from Tripod.




Usually, you'll want to try a few databases, since no single database covers the research comprehensively.


Keep in mind that most academic journal article databases work in similar ways. Look for common features and if you find an effective strategy for one database, try using it in another.



Knowing which database to start with is only part of finding relevant sources.


Choosing effective search terms is another key aspect of finding sources.


Questions to ask while
choosing search terms:

  • What are synonyms for my topic?

  • Do scholars refer to my topic using particular language?

  • Do the terms referring to my topic change depending on the political or social beliefs of the speaker?

    • e.g. "pro-choice" vs. "anti-choice" vs. "pro-life"

  • Are there historical names for the place(s), people, and ideas you're studying?

  • Have the preferred terms used by the groups you're studying changed over time?

Advanced Searching

pulls it all together, so you can actually find relevant sources.


Example 1:

("gender identity") AND (wom?n OR fem*)









Example 2:

("counterculture" OR "hippie*") AND (parent* OR mother* OR father*)




part three (of three)

Evaluating potential sources

A citation or Tripod record gives you valuable clues about the article or book.


Ask:

- Which publisher has published this book?  
Is this a scholarly press? 

- Who is the author?  

If the author is an academic, where do they teach?  In what department?  What field is their PhD in? What journals have they published in?  What is the author's experience with the topic they're writing about?

Another quick way to evaluate an article or book and its place in the scholarly literature is to check how many times it has been cited.


You can use Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.com) to search for the article or book.

Use the Advanced Search if you're having difficulty finding the specific article or book. (This often happens with generic titles or authors who have common names.)


Remember:

When you're looking for articles or books, you're looking for entry points into a scholarly conversation.


Usually, scholars will situate their question and argument within the broader scholarly debate.  You'll usually find evidence of this near the beginning of the article or book.
 





Feel free to make an appointment (via email - selichk1).

Office hours at the McCabe Research & Info Desk, Fall 2014:
Mondays, 3-5 PM
Wednesdays, 1-3 PM