Using Sources & Avoiding Plagiarism

Jackie Sipes, Education Librarian

jsipes@temple.edu

Why Cite?

Support or validate your argument

Why Cite?

Support or validate your argument

Give credit where credit is due

Why Cite?

Support or validate your argument

Courtesy to your reader

Give credit where credit is due

When to Cite

You must give credit whenever you
use another person’s ideas, theories, research methods, or research results, whether it’s a direct quote
or paraphrasing.

 

What if I don't cite?

When you do not give credit to an author’s ideas or work,
you are committing plagiarism

 

Plagiarism is stealing.

 

Plagiarism

 

Failing to properly cite the work of another also constitutes plagiarism, even if it is unintentional.

Consequences of Plagiarism

  • Penalties range from failing an assignment, course to expulsion from Temple
  • Academic career

Plagiarism

Includes...

Cutting and pasting information from the internet without citing where you got that information

Plagiarism

Includes...

Cutting and pasting information from the internet without citing where you got that information

Buying or downloading research papers from the internet

Plagiarism

Includes...

Cutting and pasting information from the internet without citing where you got that information

Buying or downloading research papers from the internet

Submitting the same paper you wrote in more than one class

Plagiarism

Includes...

Cutting and pasting information from the internet without citing where you got that information

Using someone else's words or ideas without citing them

Buying or downloading research papers from the internet

Submitting the same paper you wrote in more than one class

Plagiarism

Includes...

Cutting and pasting information from the internet without citing where you got that information

Using someone else's words or ideas without citing them

Buying or downloading research papers from the internet

Submitting the same paper you wrote in more than one class

Inaccurate paraphrasing

Most common confusion about plagiarism

inaccurate understanding of paraphrasing

=

Using Sources

Direct Quote

Paraphrase

*From TU Writing Center

Direct Quote

Quote: quotation taken directly from the source text.

Use when the original author has expressed something so well that you could not replicate it or when only the words of an expert will suffice as evidence for your claim. 

Using Sources

Paraphrase

Paraphrase: A brief summary of a source's ideas, using your own words and structure.

Use to draw in another writer's ideas or information, but with an emphasis on your interpretation or reflection on that information.

Using Sources

changing just a few words and/or sentence structure

Inaccurate Paraphrasing

Paraphrase

Try to paraphrase without the original source in front of you. You can always check your

accuracy later, but you'll be far less tempted to "borrow" too much from the source if you can't actually see while you're writing.

Using Sources

Writing Center

www.temple.edu/writingctr

Education Resources

Education Source

Google Scholar

ERIC

Education Resources

library.temple.edu

Thank you!

 

Jackie Sipes, Education Librarian

jsipes@temple.edu

Graduate Plagiarism Presentation - Sarah Cordes

By jsipes

Graduate Plagiarism Presentation - Sarah Cordes

  • 701