All decks
  • Workshop - Let's Build Our First Plugin!

    If you’ve ever wanted to build your own plugin for WordPress, this is the session for you. We’re going to start from scratch and work our way up. First, we’ll take a look at the basic requirements of a plugin. Next we’ll take our example plugin idea and break it into the various components and steps that we’ll need. We’ll code up the plugin together and install it on our sites, debugging any problems that arise. Finally, we’ll look at ways that we could further extend our plugin. This tutorial assumes some HTML and CSS knowledge, but you don’t already need to be familiar with writing PHP or JavaScript.

  • Ethical Web Design: Serving More of Your Visitors

    Building websites well is hard. There are time and budget constraints, requests from various departments, and legal requirements that need to be balanced. On top of all of that there's a whole business behind the site to manage! It's no wonder that the needs of the actual users of the site can often come last, yet they're the exact people who should be first in line when it comes to how you build your website. In this talk we'll briefly discuss some of the ethical implications of building and running a website and how you can balance the wants of your clients with the needs of site users and visitors.

  • WordPress and the Block Editor

    Did you know that Gutenberg and the WordPress Block Editor are different things? That's the first thing that we're going to cover in getting the most out of the editor that has been the default since launching in December 2018 with WordPress v5.0. During this talk we'll cover the following topics: - Misconceptions around Gutenberg and the Block Editor - What separates the Block Editor from Page Builders - Converting Classic Editor sites to the Block Editor - Useful Block Plugins - Building a Block Editor landing page in minutes

  • WordCamp US 2019 - The Power of CSS: Cool Things To Do With Styles - Lightning Talk

    Frontend Developers are trained to work with JavaScript, and to use it to create interactivity on sites. But there are plenty of cool things that you can do with standard HTML and CSS. Whether it’s fitting images into boxes, fitting boxes onto screens, or filling screens with beautifully animated user interactions, CSS can have you covered!

  • The Power of CSS: Cool Things To Do With Styles

    Frontend Developers are trained to work with JavaScript, and to use it to create interactivity on sites. But there are plenty of cool things that you can do with standard HTML and CSS. Whether it’s fitting images into boxes, fitting boxes onto screens, or filling screens with beautifully animated user interactions, CSS can have you covered!

  • WordCamp Denver 2019 - Let's Build Our First Plugin!

    If you’ve ever wanted to build your own plugin for WordPress, this is the session for you. We’re going to start from scratch and work our way up. First, we’ll take a look at the basic requirements of a plugin. Next we’ll take our example plugin idea and break it into the various components and steps that we’ll need. We’ll code up the plugin together and install it on our sites, debugging any problems that arise. Finally, we’ll look at ways that we could further extend our plugin. This tutorial assumes some HTML and CSS knowledge, but you don’t already need to be familiar with writing PHP or JavaScript.

  • WordCamp Jacksonville - Is it Moral to Click Like? Ethics on the Web.

    Most professions have defined codes of ethics, and their educational programs have requirements of ethical coursework to get degrees. For some reason it’s not accepted that all computer science programs and developer bootcamps should have ethics courses. With the sheer amount of harm done by tech, this is mind boggling. This topic has picked up a lot of traction thanks to tireless work by a few individuals in our community, but ethical thinking should be in all of our minds while working. We’ll look at a few ethical frameworks and standards, as well as some examples for how they can be applied. It’s time for a discussion on ethics in the web, how we can individually apply ethical thinking in our work, and how to share this with others.

  • WordCamp Montclair 2019 - Let's Build Our First Plugin!

    If you’ve ever wanted to build your own plugin for WordPress, this is the session for you. We’re going to start from scratch and work our way up. First, we’ll take a look at the basic requirements of a plugin. Next we’ll take our example plugin idea and break it into the various components and steps that we’ll need. We’ll code up the plugin together and install it on our sites, debugging any problems that arise. Finally, we’ll look at ways that we could further extend our plugin. This tutorial assumes some HTML and CSS knowledge, but you don’t already need to be familiar with writing PHP or JavaScript.

  • WordCamp Montclair 2019 - Let's Build Our First Plugin!

    If you’ve ever wanted to build your own plugin for WordPress, this is the session for you. We’re going to start from scratch and work our way up. First, we’ll take a look at the basic requirements of a plugin. Next we’ll take our example plugin idea and break it into the various components and steps that we’ll need. We’ll code up the plugin together and install it on our sites, debugging any problems that arise. Finally, we’ll look at ways that we could further extend our plugin. This tutorial assumes some HTML and CSS knowledge, but you don’t already need to be familiar with writing PHP or JavaScript.

  • WordPress Orlando 28 May 2019

  • WordPress 101 - Orlando Blogger Union

  • WordCamp Atlanta 2019 - Let's Build Our First Plugin!

    If you’ve ever wanted to build your own plugin for WordPress, this is the session for you. We’re going to start from scratch and work our way up. First, we’ll take a look at the basic requirements of a plugin. Next we’ll take our example plugin idea and break it into the various components and steps that we’ll need. We’ll code up the plugin together and install it on our sites, debugging any problems that arise. Finally, we’ll look at ways that we could further extend our plugin. This tutorial assumes some HTML and CSS knowledge, but you don’t already need to be familiar with writing PHP or JavaScript.

  • WordPress and the IndieWeb: Why You Should Own Your Voice

    WordPress can be used to start a blog, make a site for a club, or power a business, large or small. WordPress can also be used as a way to document your life, and save important things for later. You can bridge WordPress to other parts of the web that you use to store all of your data in one place, without having to worry about an app, hardware maker, or social media site going out of business and taking all of your content with it. I considered myself an interloper into the IndieWeb movement, until I realized that the movement — just like the technology that powers it — is decentralized. My habit of copying data created on other sites, as well as creating a website for my lifelogging, is part of what this community is about. Come learn about how you can use WordPress to power and amplify your voice online, and reclaim the web from the walled gardens for the user!

  • WPOrlando 22 January 2019

  • Processes for Managing WordPress Support — With WordPress!

  • php[World] Building a Child Theme in WordPress

    If you’ve ever wanted to build your own theme for WordPress, this is the session for you. We’re going to start from scratch and work our way up. This tutorial assumes HTML and CSS knowledge, though there is no level of PHP requirement. We’ll go through all of the core files needed for a theme; some supplemental features that can be added; and how themes should be structured for clients, public free release, and sales sites. We’ll also cover some tools that can help with your theme development.

  • Is it Moral to Click Like?

  • Don’t Be Afraid of Gutenberg

  • Building a Child Theme in WordPress

    If you’ve ever wanted to build your own theme for WordPress, this is the session for you. We’re going to start from scratch and work our way up. This tutorial assumes HTML and CSS knowledge, though there is no level of PHP requirement. We’ll go through all of the core files needed for a theme; some supplemental features that can be added; and how themes should be structured for clients, public free release, and sales sites. We’ll also cover some tools that can help with your theme development.