D0 tutorial

D0 tutorial

(A.K.A learning JS, Typescript, Async programming and Git so you can survive this term)

Javascript vs. Typescript

Javascript

Javascript

+

Types

Javascript

+

Types

+

Some neat OOP constructs

Javascript

+

Types

+

Some neat OOP constructs

=

Typescript

Examples

var Greeter = (function () {
    function Greeter(message) {
        this.greeting = message;
    }
    Greeter.prototype.greet = function () {
        return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
    };
    return Greeter;
})();

Plain JS

Plain JS

Typescript

var Greeter = (function () {
    function Greeter(message) {
        this.greeting = message;
    }
    Greeter.prototype.greet = function () {
        return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
    };
    return Greeter;
})();
class Greeter {
    greeting: string;
    constructor (message: string) {
        this.greeting = message;
    }
    greet() {
        return "Hello, " + this.greeting;
    }
}

Typescript

interface Thing {
    [key: string]: number | string;
}

Interfaces are great and you should use them!

Typescript gotchas

Typescript gotchas

Typescript types are optional

Typescript gotchas

Typescript types are optional

Always use types. It catches bugs that are easily detected by a typing system

Typescript gotchas

Typescript

Transpiler

Javascript

Typescript gotchas

Typescript

Transpiler

Javascript

Therefore, you will see javascript (.js) files, but you should work on the typescript (.ts)  files

Typescript gotchas

let list = [4, 5, 6];

for (let i in list) {
   console.log(i); // "0", "1", "2",
}
let list = [4, 5, 6];

for (let i of list) {
   console.log(i); // "4", "5", "6"
}

For ... in

For ... of

Typescript gotchas

Do not use ==

Use === instead

Typescript gotchas

Visit

for more

Async programming in Typescript

Async programming in Typescript

(a.k.a reason why most students failed the deliverable. Really. )

Async programming in Typescript

(a.k.a reason why most students failed the deliverable. Really. )

We can change this.

Why Async?

Why Async?

Why Async?

Why Async?

Why Async?

Promises to the rescue!

Async with promises

let GetNumberFromAPI = function () {
    return Math.round(Math.random()*10) + 1;
}

function GetEvenNumberPromise(): Promise<number> { 
    return new Promise(function (fulfill, reject) {
        var n = GetNumberFromAPI(); // remote code being executed, it takes a while
        if (n % 2 === 0) {
            fulfill(n);
        } else {
            reject(n);
        }
    });
}

let ItIsEven = function(EvenNumber: number) {
   console.log("It is even! Number is: ", EvenNumber);
}

let ItIsOdd = function(OddNumber: number) {
   console.log("It is odd! Number is: ", OddNumber);    
}

let promise = GetEvenNumberPromise();

// First argument is a function that handles the success
// Second argument is a function that handles the rejection
promise.then(ItIsEven, ItIsOdd)
       .catch(//them all)

console.log("This is going to be printed first");

Array of promises

 

function GetTwoNumbers(): Promise[] {

    let evenNumbersPromises: Promise[] = [];

    for (let i=0; i<2; i++) {

        evenNumbersPromises.push(GetEvenNumberPromise())
        
    }
    console.log('list of promises is ', evenNumbersPromises)
    return evenNumbersPromises

}

let evenNumbers = GetTwoNumbers();

let AllEven = function(evenNums: number[]){
    console.log('All are even! They are; ', evenNums)
}

let AllNotEven = function(evenNums: number[]){
    console.log('All are not even... Rejected instance is; ', evenNums)
}

// evenNumbers should be an 'iterable', you pass an array of reject/fulfills
Promise.all(evenNumbers).then(AllEven, AllNotEven)

- Do I really need async?

Yes.

- Why?

Because without it your code will be painfully slow and it will timeout the test

Git

(A.K.A how to collaboratively manage your code and not feel like hurting your teammate's feelings )

Git

Github's servers

Your machine

Git basic workflow

Git basic workflow

1. Clone or pull remote repository

git clone $YOUR_REPOSITORY_URL
git pull origin master
// In case you already have the repository
// locally, but it's not up to date

Git basic workflow

2. Change the code

Git basic workflow

3. Stage the changes by adding the changed files

git add --all

Git basic workflow

git commit -m "my neat commit"

4. Commit the changes locally

Git basic workflow

4. Commit the changes locally

git commit -m "my neat commit"

Your changes are saved LOCALLY. Now you have to send these changes to GitHub

Git basic workflow

4. Push the code!

git push origin master

Git basic workflow

4. Push the code!

git push origin master

Now you can see the changes on your GitHub repository

Git best practices

Git best practices

Avoid pushing big commits. Push small, early, and often

Git best practices

Git best practices

Never *ever* push broken code.

Git best practices

Back it up before doing something risky

Git best practices

Use meaningful commit messages

Git best practices

More about git here:

Free questions time!

deck

By Rodrigo Araújo

deck

  • 1,062
Loading comments...

More from Rodrigo Araújo