AI & Publishing

A Categorization Structure for Understanding AI in Publishing Workflows

Based on an article by Paul Shannon, John Chodacki, Adam Hyde

 

"An Initial Scholarly AI Taxonomy"

https://upstream.force11.org/an-initial-scholarly-ai-taxonomy/

"The public release of ChatGPT in November 2022, has opened up new possibilities and heightened awareness of AI's potential role in various aspects of our work and life.."

 

https://upstream.force11.org/an-initial-scholarly-ai-taxonomy/

What the world worried about...

AUTHORSHIP

What the SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING world worried about...

"Large Language Models (LLMs), such as ChatGPT, do not currently satisfy our authorship criteria. Notably an attribution of authorship carries with it accountability for the work, which cannot be effectively applied to LLMs."

https://www.nature.com/nature-portfolio/editorial-policies/ai

authorship

FACTS

(HALLUCINATIONS)

What the SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING world worried about...

"So, use ChatGPT at your own peril. Just as I would not recommend collaborating with a colleague with pseudologia fantastica, I do not recommend ChatGPT as an aid to scientific writing."

ChatGPT: these are not hallucinations – they’re fabrications and falsifications

Robin Emsley

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41537-023-00379-4

collaborating with a colleague with pseudologia fantastica

 

So, use ChatGPT at your own peril.

TRUST

What the SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING world worried about...

  • Its not all about authorship or facts

     
  • AI is a general tool

     
  • We need to identify the many roles of AI can play in Publishing Workflows

     
  • Only then can we discuss the ethics meaningfully

 

  1. Extract
  2. Validate
  3. Generate
  4. Analyse
  5. Reformat
  6. Discover
  7. Translate

An Initial Scholarly AI Taxonomy

 

  1. Extract: Identify and isolate specific entities or data points within the content.
     
  2. Validate: Verify the accuracy and reliability of the information.
     
  3. Generate: Produce new content or ideas, such as text or images.
     
  4. Analyse: Examine patterns, relationships, or trends within the information.
  5. Reformat: Modify and adjust information to fit specific formats or presentation styles.
  6. Discover: Search for and locate relevant information or connections.
  7. Translate: Convert information from one language or form to another.

An Initial Scholarly AI Taxonomy

 

  1. Extract: Identify and isolate specific entities or data points within the content.
     
  2. Validate: Verify the accuracy and reliability of the information.
     
  3. Generate: Produce new content or ideas, such as text or images.
     
  4. Analyse: Examine patterns, relationships, or trends within the information.
     
  5. Reformat: Modify and adjust information to fit specific formats or presentation styles.
     
  6. Discover: Search for and locate relevant information or connections.
     
  7. Translate: Convert information from one language or form to another.

An Initial Scholarly AI Taxonomy

 

  1. Extract: Identify and isolate specific entities or data points within the content.
     
  2. Validate: Verify the accuracy and reliability of the information.
     
  3. Generate: Produce new content or ideas, such as text or images.
     
  4. Analyse: Examine patterns, relationships, or trends within the information.
     
  5. Reformat: Modify and adjust information to fit specific formats or presentation styles.
     
  6. Discover: Search for and locate relevant information or connections.
     
  7. Translate: Convert information from one language or form to another.

An Initial Scholarly AI Taxonomy

"This initial taxonomy outlined in this article can serve as a starting point for understanding how AI can contribute to publishing workflows. By quantifying AI contributions in this way, we can also discuss the ethical boundaries of AI-assisted workflows more clearly and help publishers make informed decisions about AI integration."

Our Conclusion

AI and Publishing

By Adam Hyde

AI and Publishing

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