Online Interactions

Challenges and Potentials

Design Matters

The Power of Personal Prompts

First Video Example

A Cognitive Prompt triggers a Cognitive Response

Second Video Example

A Personal Prompt modelling self-awareness 

triggers self-awareness and emotional intelligence.

1. Newsclip Prompt

On Gender Issues

1. Student Responses

In self-facilitated peer group

2. Student Responses

In self-facilitated peer group

2. Peer Video Prompt

On Gender Issues

PAUSE​ THE VIDEO

Reflection: Write briefly, about which dialogue agreement is especially important to you? And why?

Debrief Prompt:

Share about what you have written.

 

 

Agreements: Openness, Personal Language, Resilience,

Respect, Airtime

DESIGN MATTERS

Pre-assessing who students are to create intentional small groups.

Meaningful Differences:

 

1. Small, interactive Peer Groups can support emerging relationships.

 

 

 

 

 

DESIGN MATTERS

Pre-assessing who students are to create intentional small groups.

Meaningful Differences:

 

1. Small, interactive Peer Groups can support emerging relationships.

 

2. Micro Learning Units can introduce cross-cultural content

in interactive ways.

 

 

 

 

 

DESIGN MATTERS

Pre-assessing who students are to create intentional small groups.

Meaningful Differences:


1. Small, interactive Peer Groups can support emerging relationships.


2. Micro Learning Units can introduce cross-cultural content

in interactive ways.


3. Peer Learning can promote self-awareness, openness

and active participation.




PAUSE​ THE VIDEO

In Peer Groups: Reflect on the Prompts below.

Dialogue Prompts:


1. Identify four differences between you and your partner.


2. Remembering your Personal Culture Map: How do your stories intersect?


3. Reflect: Where do your commonalities come from?




PAUSE​ THE VIDEO

Write a brief paragraph about the following reflection prompt.

Reflection: Think of a life situation that made you feel

unsafe and/or uncomfortable.

Personal Culture Map

Peer Groups: You will go into your small groups in a moment.

REFLECTION while Watching: 


What do you feel supported participant's to engage with authenticity?

PAUSE​ THE VIDEO

Write a brief paragraph about the following reflection prompt.

Reflection: How can we overcome stereotypes that we hold personally?

Reflection Prompt

What would be your dream for youth today?

Dialogue Questions:

 

1. What one memory do you most treasure and why?

 

2. If you could change one thing

about how you were raised as a child, what would it be?

 

3. What is the one thing your

family/community taught you to value above all others?

 

Dialogue Prompts:

 

1. Identify four differences between you and your partner.

 

2. Remembering your Personal Culture Map: How do your stories intersect?

 

3. Reflect: Where do your commonalities come from?

 

Transforming Stereotypes

Stage 1: Pick a Stereotype

 

Stage 2: Translate it into a Generalisation

 

Stage 3: Create a Hypothesis to increase understanding

 

One Example for

Transforming Stereotypes

Hurtful Stereotype:  "US Americans are superficial."

 

 

Generalization:  "The way some US Americans speak

                               make them appear superficial."

 

Hypothesis:  "Maybe US Americans avoid some topics

                         due to the current polarised climate."

Openness: We commit to learning to understand and not to persuade. 


Personal: We aim to use personal language and avoid hurtful generalizations. 



Resilience: We commit to listening when something is hard to hear.

Airtime: We aim to share "airtime" carefully and equally.

Respect: We aim to value another person and not interrupt.

 

Regarding our Way of Speaking and Listening

 

Dialogue Agreements

Cultural Sensitivity is defined as:

“The capability to generate increasingly more complex perceptions and experience of cultural difference.”

Bhawuk & Brislin

Belongingness represents—and gives power and force

to the concepts of diversity and inclusion.”

Montrece McNeill Ransom

Micro-agressions is defined as:

"A statement, action, or incident regarded as an instance

of indirect, subtle, or unintentional discrimination

against members of a marginalized group

such as a racial or ethnic minority."

Micro-invalidation is defined as: 

“The downplaying of a person’s experience of a micro-aggression.”

"We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality,

tied in a single garment of destiny.

Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly."  

 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr.

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By crossingborderseducation

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