DESIGNING WITH
PURPOSE

EVERY DESIGN ELEMENT SHOULD HAVE A REASON FOR EXISTING

  • Typography
  • Color
  • Line
  • Shape
  • Image

ASK: WHAT'S THE REASON WHY I'M USING THIS?

ANSWER:

  • Supports the content
  • Supports the CONCEPT
  • It helps creates visual awareness 
  • Helps create visual separation
  • It helps create visual clarity to the viewer

 

ANSWER SHOULD NEVER BE

  • Because it looks good
  • Because I like it
  • Because it fills up negative space

WHY SHOULD I CARE?

Design elements that don't have a purpose:

  • create weak compositions
  • dilute the concept
  • create visual confusion
  • create visual noise
  • create an urgency of "needing" to include an element when in fact a piece is stronger without

STEPS TO HELP YOU DESIGN WITH PURPOSE

Simplicity is better then complexity

(KIS)

STEP ONE: RESEARCH

DESIGN FOR AN AUDIENCE, NOT YOURSELF

  • Who is your audience?
  • How do you best communicate to them?
  • What has already been done?
  • What elements can you use to engage your audience and communicate your message?

STEP TWO: HAVE A STRONG, CLEAR CONCEPT

  • WTF is a concept?!? It's more than an idea
  • Strong concepts help create a clear path while weak concepts create confusion and indecision
  • Make sure your concept is completely flushed out before starting visual work
  • Have a clear idea on how you want to visually execute your concept
  • Who is your audience?
  • Thumbnail/exploratory sketches help either strengthen your concept or will poke holes in it

 

STEP THREE: GATHER VISUAL INSPIRATION

  • Think about the mood/message and how to best visually communicate that to your audience
  • Use the web, photography, found items as inspiration
  • Create a mood board or style tile
  • Keep this inspiration in mind as you move onto the next step

STEP FOUR: CREATE

  • Refer back to your mood boards, research and concept statement to make sure you're following through.
  • Only add design elements if it helps communicate the message to the viewer or it directly relates to the concept
  • Constantly ask yourself questions

STEP FIVE: EVALUATE

  • One you finish a design, your job is not done.
  • Show it to your target audience and get feedback

ASK

  • Does it communicate?
  • Does it engage?
  • Is it confusing?
  • Is it unique?
  • What can you do better?

STEP SIX: REVISE

  • Revise your concept based on feedback
  • There's always room for improvement
  • Don't be afraid to start over
  • Keep your audience in mind

DESIGNINGWITHPURPOSE

By shadow4611

DESIGNINGWITHPURPOSE

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