PRESENTING WORK

TIPS

  • Pre­pare thoroughly
  • Speak fac­tu­ally, coher­ently, dis­tinctly and not too quickly
  • Inter­sperse your speak­ing with appro­pri­ate pauses to allow your audi­ence to absorb the information
  • Be as artic­u­late as possible
  • Argue con­vin­cingly, object­ively and fairly
  • Main­tain eye contact
  • Don’t speak for longer than your audience’s atten­tion span allows

Bad Presentations Can Kill Good Ideas!

A good presentation

  • Should be well organized
  • Engages the audience
  • Is professional

Plan

  • Don't overload your slides
  • Don't read from your slides. They should be a visual representation of what your talking about
  • Nothing- not even your slides, should upstage you and the discussion between you and the client
  • Provide an easy to follow story line
  • Practice your presentation

Structure

  • Recap creative brief
  • Present solution
  • Discuss how solution works to solve their design problem
  • Outline key points and advantages
  • Summarize

Slides

  • If using a presentation tool, make sure slides look professional and have a consistent look
  • Don't read from slides!
  • Don't overload with text
  • Walk away from the computer
  • Don't use built in slide transitions 
  • Remember: it should be there as a guide, not as your entire presentation!

Client Convincing

  • Maintain your status as an expert
  • Use an optimistic approach
  • EDUCATE YOUR CLIENTS
  • Have a convincing presentation
  • Discuss the benefits
  • Have confidence in the solution
  • Try not to be nervous

REMEMBER, YOU ARE THE EXPERT AND THAT'S WHY THEY HIRED YOU!

CLIENTS

TYPES AND HOW TO DEAL WITH THEM

Passive-Aggressive

Communication is mostly one-sided and unhelpful during project development. “I’m not really sure what we’re looking for.”

  • Patience is the key. 
  • Expecting the last-minute requests for revisions.
  •  Keep your original layered design intact so that you can easily refine and change it later (not that you wouldn’t, but it does happen).

Under-Valuer

Client will devalue your creative contributions. “It’s not like it takes much effort on your part.” 
  • Confidence is key.  The under-valuer will recognize this confidence. 
  • Don’t back down or concede a point to the client when discussing your role in the project. 
  • Standing firm will establish the professional and respectful tone you deserve. 

The Nit-Picker

Client is never fully satisfied with the work. “I’m really not sure about this element here. It just doesn’t pop!” 
  • Patience is important 
  • Try to detach yourself from the project as much as possible, so that the constant nit-pickery does not affect you personally. 

PRESENTING WORK

By shadow4611

PRESENTING WORK

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