1. Discovery

2. Design

The 4 Stages of Web Development

1. Discovery

2. Design

3. Development

4. Deployment

The 4 Stages of Web Development

Discovery

  • Kickoff
  • Design Research &  Analysis
  • Strategy Brief

Design

  •  Wireframes/UX Sketches
  • Page Tables
  • Visual Design
  • Interaction Design
  • Style Guide

Develop

  • HTML/CSS/Theming (front-end)
  • CMS/Template Implementation/PHP (back-end)
  • Cross Browser/Cross Device Testing (QC)

Deployment

  • Content Migration
  • Usability Testing
  • Training
  • Launch

1. Discovery

2. Design

3. Development

4. Deployment

The 4 Stages of Web Development

Discovery

Discovery

Discovery

Kickoff: Establish communication protocols, milestones, timelines, deliverables and scope, roles and expectations. Usually a 1hr meeting

Discovery

  • Design Research & Analysis: Content inventory, writing style, visual design, interface/nav design. Understand the industry, the organization, and the brand.
    • Site map
    • Content Inventory
    • Design/Business Goals
    • Competitive Analysis
    • Personas, user & stakeholder interviews
    • Worskshop
  • UX Brief: Provide concise documentation of the discovery phase in the form of strategies to move forward.

Site Map

Discovery

User Flows

Discovery

Design

Web Design History

Table Based Layouts

  • Before CSS, styling options were limited to the display features of HTML.
  • Tables were used to create complex layouts. Without them, design elements flowed from top left to lower right, like a word processor.

Web Design History

Image Slicing

  • More complex, visual web designs used “sliced”
    images.
  • Images were sliced into smaller rectangles, then
    reassembled within the cells of a table. Made
    page loading more efficient.

Web Design History

Content vs Form

  • In modern Web design, content (HTML) and
    form (CSS) are kept separate.
  • A web page may look and behave differently on
    your desktop than it does on your smartphone,
    and change based on user context.
  • Check out the CSS Zen Garden

Web Design Today

CSS Based Layouts

  • Contemporary web designers must think in
    modules, rather than in large static pages/
    images.
  • Visual elements are isolated and positioned
    within <div> tags, whose placement is defined
    by CSS.

Web Design Today

Responsive Design

  • RWD attempts to accommodate various screen
    sizes, device types, and user context.
  • Rather than creating multiple versions of a site
    for different context, a RWD workflow focuses
    on a single, flexible site.

Web Design Today

Design Approach

Design is not decoration.
It solves a problem.

Design Approach

Content is king.

Content should inform the design and form

Design Process

  • With the shift from static, table-based layouts to
    responsive, fluid layouts, the process and the
    relationship between designer and client has
    changed.
  • Responsive design is a much more fluid process and
    wireframing, sketching and prototyping are typically
    more powerful tools. The designer must demonstrate
    the power of responsive on multiple devices.
  • Client is much more involved from start to finish.. more like a partner.

Design Process

Print vs. Screen

  • Color
  • Type
  • Accessibility
  • Mobile
  • Context

Design

  • Design: Wireframes/UX Sketches - establish a design system
  • Page Tables: Page Tables - keep content independent of design. Provide page tables listing content in order of
    importance.
  • Visual Design: Branding, color and type
  • Interaction Design: Prototypes & Usability Testing
  • Style Guide: Document the style, spacing, design thinking

Design Deliverables

  • Wireframes/UX Sketches - establish a design system
  • Page Tables: Page Tables - keep content independent of design. Provide page tables listing content in order of importance.
  • Visual Design: Branding, color and type
  • Interaction Design: Prototypes & Usability Testing
  • Style Guide: Document the style, spacing, design thinking
  • Build a Pattern Library http://alistapart.com/blog/post/
    getting-started-with-pattern-libraries

Design Deliverables

Wireframes/UX Sketches 

  • Minimal grayscale sketches that establish what needs to be on the page and the hierarchy
  • Tools: PhotoShop, Illustrator, Sketch, Affinity Designer, Pen/Paper, Omnigraffle, Cacoo

Design Deliverables

Style Tiles

  • Explore styles to be applied to the design. http://styletil.es/
  • Tools: PhotoShop, Illustrator, Sketch, Affinity Designer

Design Deliverables

Visual Designs

  • Establish design patterns for key pages and templates
  • Tools: HTML/CSS, PhotoShop, Illustrator, Sketch, Affinity Designer

Information Architecture

An IA expert asks​

  • How can information be organized in a way
    that facilitates usability and findability?
  • What is the flow of users through a website?

IA is the information backbone of the site;
Navigation refers to those elements in the UI that allow users to reach specific information on the site.

Information Architecture

  • target audience
  • technology
  • data that will be presented
  • usability test results

IA focuses on

Information Architecture

  • Content inventory: Examination of a website to locate and identify existing site content
  • Content audit: Evaluation of content usefulness, accuracy, tone of voice, and overall effectiveness
  • Information grouping: Definition of user-centered relationships between content
  • Taxonomy development: Definition of a standardized naming convention (controlled vocabulary) to apply to all site content.
  • Descriptive information creation: Definition of useful metadata that can be utilized to generate “Related Link” lists or other navigation components that aid discovery.

Information Architecture

  • site map
  • content map
  • user flows
  • content flows
  • personas
  • navigation

Deliverables

Information Architecture

  • What is the flow of users through our site?
  • How does the application help the user catalog their information?
  • How is that information presented back to the user?
  • Is that information helping the customer, and driving decisions?

Questions to answer

Information Architecture

  • research the audience and the business
  • analyze data with an eye on the site’s primary
    objectives
  • create personas representing of the goals
    and behavior of a real group of users

Ways to answer the key questions

Information Architecture

  • Break down your information into multiple
    categories
  • Provide multiple paths into the categories,
    anticipating users’ queries
  • Provide multiple levels of detail

Ways to answer the key questions

Information Architecture

  •  Define a site’s goals (mission)
  • Define the user experience (audience)
  • Identify content (group and label)
  • Site Map
  • Define Navigation
  • Wireframes

key steps

Information Architecture

How will a site work from a practical perspective?

Site Structure

  • Site maps
  • Site Flow Diagrams
  • Wireframes

Information Architecture

A well designed primary navigation system
should introduce the viewer to—and remind of
—the main conceptual structure for the
information.

Navigation

Information Architecture

Key navigation components include:

Navigation

  • global navigation
  • local navigation
  • utility navigation,
  • breadcrumbs
  • related links
  • footers
  • fat footers

Information Architecture

For each navigation component, a series of decisions must be made:

Navigation

  • Usage Priority: How much will users rely on this navigation component? Example, will users primarily navigate the site using local navigation? Or are they likely to more heavily rely on related links?
  • Placement: On what pages should it be present? Where should it be placed within the page layout grid? (e.g., top, left-hand, right-hand, bottom)
  • Pattern: Which navigation design patterns best support findability and discoverability — Tabs, megamenus, carousels, accordions (as well as other options)

User Experience (UX)

How a user perceives a website:

  • Does this website give me value?
  • Is it easy to use?
  • Is it pleasant to use?

User Experience (UX)

User Experience (UX)

UX vs.UI

  • UX Design is not the same as UI Design
  • UX Focuses on the User Experience
  • UI is the design of User Interface Components

RWD Workflow

  • Content Inventory: establish and describe the content. This gives you your raw materials
  • Content reference wireframes: establish rough responsive wireframes in HTML. Allows for really fast iterations.
  • Design in text (structured content): establishes content hierarchy and structure. Easily revisable.
  • Linear Design: Test out the plain jane structured content in HTML in the browser.
  • Breakpoint graph: display visually where the breakpoints happen
  • Design for various breakpoints: Start with the small screen first, then expand until it looks bad. TIME FOR A BREAKPOINT!

RWD Workflow

  • Present prototype screenshots: It’s part of a presentation psychology – Presenting static “impressions” of the design across the different
    breakpoints allows you to stay ahead of your client.
  • Present prototype after revisions: Once revisions have been made, you can show the design in action
  • Document for production: Deliver a style guide along with the production code.

HTML design prototype: If w’ere not delivering designs in PS, what do we deliver? Clients wants PS because they’re used to it. Create HTML CSS, and maybe a bit of JS

  • header (nav)
  • main content
  • sidebar (secondary content)
  • footer

Using pencil and paper as folded draw wireframe sketches for various device sizes and orientations for a website containing these common sections:

  1. Take an 8.5" x 11" piece of plain paper and fold it in half to 8.5x5.5, half again to 4.25x5.5, then to 2.75x4.25…
  2. Phone: On the two 2.75x4.25 sides, draw a wireframe for each orientation — portrait and landscape…
  3. Tablet: Unfold to an 4.25x5.5 side and draw one wireframe on the blank side — choose either landscape or portrait orientation
  4. Desktop: Open to full size landscape and draw one wireframe.

RWD Exercise

Art 320: L2 Discovery and Design

By shadow4611

Art 320: L2 Discovery and Design

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